Why You Need Probiotics in Your Skin Care!

Probiotics are the new buzz word for enhancing your Pet’s Grooming regimen, thanks to the award-winning line of products from Skout’s Honor…but the truth is that Probiotics in Human Skin Care/Beauty Products is where it all began…

A decade ago, the thought of embracing bacteria would have raised plenty of eyebrows. However, with growing wellness trends, a lot of health-driven individuals have no problem embracing the bacteria that is probiotics.

While bacteria does have a bad reputation, it’s important to remember that they’re not all bad. There exists microflora that can be extremely beneficial to the body. So much so that they’ve been included in foods and created in supplement form. That being said, what exactly are these good bacteria that everyone seems to be centering their lifestyle and diet on?

What Are Probiotics?

According to studies, the health of one’s gut can actually impact their general wellbeing (1). Thus it is important to keep your gut health in check, and that’s where probiotics come in.

Probiotics are live microorganisms that inhabit both inside and on the surface of the body. They are good bacteria because they keep the gut healthy by countering the harmful effects of bad bacteria. Alcohol, a poor diet and even antibiotics can upset this balance and jeopardize your health.

Aside from supplements, these good bacteria can also be found in fermented foods such as yoghurt, kefir, sauerkraut and kombucha. Thus, as they can influence the health of our guts, can they also do the same for our skin?

Probiotics And Skin Care

Similar to the gut, the skin also contains a large population of microflora that can affect its appearance. A change in this microflora can result in dull and prematurely aged skin. It can also trigger inflammatory skin conditions such as redness and acne.

The topical use of probiotics on the skin can help to alleviate these concerns by balancing out the skin’s bacterial population. A benefit of this would be added protection against environmental threats such as sun damage.

According to a study published in the International Journal of Women’s Dermatology, probiotics can help to diminish the signs of aging by encouraging the production of collagen.

Probiotics also help to hydrate the skin, alleviate redness and sensitivity as well as combat inflammatory skin concerns such as acne,  psoriasis and eczema (2).

Does My Skin Need Probiotics?

Our lifestyle choices aren’t only affecting our gut health but they’re also disrupting the microfloral balance in our skin. Furthermore, the use of skincare products rich in parabens and sulfates can also cause disarray.

Hence, those with sensitive skin, inflammatory flareups as well as those living in a city will each benefit from including probiotics in their skincare regimes. In fact, a study from the American Academy of Dermatology revealed that they could actually be the key to both acne and rosacea treatments.

NOTE: This blog is a re-post from an article posted on Longevitylive.com 

 

GQ.com: For Healthy Skin, Just Add…Bacteria?

There is more bacteria on our skin than inside of our body!

Just like your gut, your skin can benefit from the right balance of bacteria. Marketing for soaps and hand sanitizers typically uses scorched-earth language, stuff like “Kills 99.99% of germs!” The idea being: Destroy all bacteria. But that might actually be bad for you—the way antibiotics disturb your body’s chemical makeup. Like your stomach, your skin has a delicate balance of bacteria called a “microbiome.”

“Our bodies are a symbiotic organism that rely heavily on their relationship with bacteria, inside and out,” says Julie E. Russak, MD, founder of Russak Dermatology Clinic. “We have more bacteria on our skin than we do in our body.”

Russak says that the skin microbiome protects us from invasive virus-causing pathogens and maintains the pH function of the skin. (That is, it prevents skin from getting too dry or too oily.) So how can we thwart the bad bacteria without offing the good stuff?

Apparently certain brands are rolling out “biome-friendly” products that specifically work to fortify the skin’s microbiome—like Mother DirtTULA, and even Clinique. They don’t necessarily contain live bacteria (though some do); instead, most contain “pre-biotics,” which stimulate the good stuff. Russak names lactic acid as one example: “It helps against acne and decreases inflammation in sensitive skin, thus restoring the barrier function of the skin, which helps with sensitive skin and eczema,” she says.

Here’s another way to look at it: Instead of an antibacterial approach (“Kill everything!”), these brands buttress the good stuff so that it’s strong enough to fend off the bad stuff on its own. (“Organize and resist!”) Another way to support your skin’s microbiome is to eliminate ingredients that kill the good microbes in the skin—these are typically the ingredients that preserve a product and thus give it a longer shelf life. So while you might sacrifice longevity on that cleanser, you make up for it by not sacrificing the healthy ecology that has effectively sustained humans for, I dunno, hundreds of thousands of years.

Your scalp and hair can benefit from a probiotic approach, too. A microbiome-friendly shampoo helps balance the oil production up top, meaning your hair gets less greasy…meaning you don’t have to shampoo as often. (This is a good thing, since shampoo strips your hair and scalp of its natural, healthy oils that keep them strong.) So, yeah, it’s a shampoo you buy so that you ultimately use shampoo less. Weird, I know, but it’s the same theory as a probiotic approach: Don’t kill the good with the bad! Preserve the good oils and increase your dependence on them, instead of stoking your repulsion to oil as a whole. You’ll have more good hair days because of it.

You can further benefit your skin and body’s microbiomes by maintain a pro-probiotic diet. “Include a wide variety of fresh, whole foods that will activate, replenish, and nourish your body,” says Russak. “And as long as you avoid common irritants such as processed foods, sugar, gluten, and dairy, your skin will thank you.” She also suggests eating foods like fermented organic veggies and fruits, as well as fermented yogurts (with live or active cultures) in moderation, though goat’s milk yogurt, coconut yogurt, and almond yogurt are good alternatives. And here’s one curveball: Russak “prescribes” sauerkraut as a source of many healthy live cultures, in addition to microbiome-friendly vitamins A, B, C, and K.

Bottom line: “A strong, balanced microbiome is essential for a glowing, healthy complexion,” Russak says.

Even if it means rubbing bacteria on your skin.

(Reposted from a Skincare GQ.com article – August 2017 – by Adam Hurley)

CURIOUS ABOUT PROBIOTICS & HOW THEY CAN BENEFIT YOUR PET’S SKIN HEALTH?  Click here to find out about Skout’s Honor’s Probiotic Skin Care line — FOR PETS!  Shop our probiotic skin care line!